INSPIRED BY SCIENCE

nubbsgalore:

aurora borealis over the april 2010 eruption of iceland’s eyjafjallajokull volcano, photographed by (click pic) ragnar th. sigurdsson, james appleton, mike herbertdavid martín castán and kristinn r. kristinsson

humanoidhistory:

Behold the planet Earth on September 14, 1966, as seen during the Gemini 11 mission. (NASA)

astronomybird:

62 Kilometers above Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko

Telescopes are in some ways like time machines. They reveal galaxies so far away that their light has taken billions of years to reach us. We in astronomy have an advantage in studying the universe, in that we can actually see the past. We owe our existence to stars, because they make the atoms of which we are formed. So if you are romantic you can say we are literally starstuff. If you’re less romantic you can say we’re the nuclear waste from the fuel that makes stars shine.

We’ve made so many advances in our understanding. A few centuries ago, the pioneer navigators learnt the size and shape of our Earth, and the layout of the continents. We are now just learning the dimensions and ingredients of our entire cosmos, and can at last make some sense of our cosmic habitat.

Sir Martin Rees, Astronomer Royal of Great Britian (via whats-out-there)
spaceexp:

Extremely long exposure of star trails on the ISS, Science Officer Don Pettit

spaceexp:

Extremely long exposure of star trails on the ISS, Science Officer Don Pettit

landscapelifescape:

Bixby Bridge, Big Sur, California, USA
(by Axe.Man)

landscapelifescape:

Bixby Bridge, Big Sur, California, USA

(by Axe.Man)

robotpignet:

STS-118, Space Shuttle Endeavour and ISS

robotpignet:

STS-118, Space Shuttle Endeavour and ISS

callstheadventurescience:

staceythinx:

Science-inspired necklaces from the Delftia Etsy store

gimme dat phylogeny of life one, and the DNA tree of life one too.